Tallahassee Trip: Day 1, Part 3 (Spiders)

DSC_5517

This was the first spider that Dad saw, the first of many to come.  I love the sun on the web…

The underside of the Bermuda Silk Spider – Nephila Clavipes – Banana Spider- Hurricane Spider- Golden Orb-Weaver – Giant Wood Spider.  I found a lot of names for it on Google. 🙂

DSC_5520

Tiny butterfly the size of a half-dollar.

DSC_5531

These I recently read are Gulf Fritillaries.  Check out the blog where I learned about them!

DSC_5532 DSC_5543

I love this dragonfly shot!  The bokeh is quite pleasing.  (bokeh = blurry background)

DSC_5548

Another Bermuda Silk Spider Nephila Clavipes – Banana Spider- Hurricane Spider- Golden Orb-Weaver – Giant Wood Spider.  But, do you see the smaller one above the large one?  In every single web they were there, so I started referring to them as the “henchmen” for the bigger spiders.  But then Dad realized that they were the males!  So, um, still sort of henchmen I suppose.  But I still cannot get over the cool pattern on the underside of these spiders!  So intricate!

DSC_5568 DSC_5569

Then an Arrowshaped Micrathena, which is an awesome name if you realize that Athena from Greek mythology was a weaver, and is credited with transforming a young prideful girl named Arachne into the first spider, giving them their Latin name.  I won’t give the whole story here, but here’s the link to the full thing: Myth of Arachne.

Arrowshaped Micrathena
Arrowshaped Micrathena
Bermuda Silk Spider Nephila Clavipes - Banana Spider- Hurricane Spider- Golden Orb-Weavers - Giant Wood Spiders
Bermuda Silk Spider Nephila Clavipes – Banana Spider- Hurricane Spider- Golden Orb-Weavers – Giant Wood Spiders
Bermuda Silk Spider Nephila Clavipes - Banana Spider- Hurricane Spider- Golden Orb-Weavers - Giant Wood Spiders
Bermuda Silk Spider Nephila Clavipes – Banana Spider- Hurricane Spider- Golden Orb-Weavers – Giant Wood Spiders

In this fourish-foot-tall cave/tunnel (my dad is 6’3 for reference) I had a very mentally traumatizing experience.  Dad had gone around the cave/tunnel while I wanted to walk through it.  I was a little worried about snakes, so I ended up running through it with my eyes on the ground.  That turned out to be a bad idea, as I ran into a spiders’ web, activating their defense mechanism.  What?  You want to know what the defense mechanism was?  Fine, I’ll tell you.  They (about 3-4 very large spiders) started jumping around and spinning their web to scare me away.  I am not ashamed to say that it worked very well.  I ran out of there as best I could in such a small space with uneven ground.  I ran around the path and found Dad, where I recounted my tale of horror and calmed down a bit.  After a few minutes I could appreciate the humor of the situation but still was wary of what may lay ahead.

DSC_5582

Thankfully, the next critter we saw was one who was a) more scared of us than we of him, b) harmless, c) one we saw in broad daylight.  A Five-Lined Skink!  I’ve previously posted about this little guy but these pictures turned out a lot better because I didn’t have the shadow from the screen on him and this guy was full grown while the other was a juvenile I think.

DSC_5584 DSC_5588 DSC_5597 DSC_5601 DSC_5605 DSC_5606

Here’s the first of my mystery birds.  Again, a big thank you to Gabriel for identifying these for me.
This guy is probably a Cape May Warbler.

DSC_5609

Here’s a leaf.  Not a hard thing to identify… 🙂  I just liked the sunlight on the leaf with the dark tree in the background.

DSC_5612

We passed a beautiful Cypress grove.

DSC_5618

A tiny brown Anole…

DSC_5619

Dad pointed out another skink while I was shooting the anole.

DSC_5620

We saw a sign in the middle of a small ravine that was pretty far away and I guessed that it might have been saying “entry prohibited”.  After a picture, we saw that I was right!  Who would have thunk?

DSC_5622

I thought this was cool… The top of it was resting on another tree, so it hadn’t quite fallen over yet.

DSC_5623

I haven’t done a Hearts In Nature post in a while, but I found one there!

DSC_5628

As we were walking along we saw our 5th spider (not counting the ones in the cave) which was a Daddy Longlegs.  Dad tried to pick him up but dropped him.

DSC_5631 DSC_5633

Take 2 worked and I was able to get a fun picture.

DSC_5635

Spider #6 was a beauty…

DSC_5639 DSC_5642
So that was really fun, and a bit frightening, but the day wasn’t over yet.  We’d see many more spiders, a giant red bug, and lots of birds!

Squid

20 Replies to “Tallahassee Trip: Day 1, Part 3 (Spiders)”

    1. Really? Google says that that was a common folktale, but in reality they aren’t poisonous or venomous and will only bite when provoked, and even then it rarely ever breaks the skin. Where did you hear that they were poisonous? I couldn’t find any sites that said that.

      Like

  1. Five-lined Skinks are not poisonous or venomous. I have handled a Five-lined Skink before with no ill effects. The only lizards that are known to be venomous are the Gila Monster, Beaded Lizard, and the Komodo Dragon. There are no lizards that are known to be poisonous.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well, I’m glad that you have actually handled them, because I was starting to get a little worried. The first time Zoe and I saw one we wanted to pick it up, but we’re prevented by Mom calling us back in. Good to know, thank you.

      Like

  2. Okay, I went a little more into depth while researching and it turns out they aren’t poisonous to humans, only cats and other animals. I do know that this is true, though, because momo (my past kitty) bit one to kill it and got really sick. He was on medications for a long time. Still, be careful!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My cat Faith has eaten Five-lined Skinks on several occasions without any ill effect however, I have never eaten one and would not recommend their consumption to anyone else.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. And btw, Atlantic poison sumac is on the rise around Florida this month because of the amount of rain we’ve had. It thrives in moist, flooded, or very muddy soils.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Those are really awesome pics of the juvenile five lined skink! I had one living at the old house and tried to shoot it, but it would somehow always evade my capture.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey, thanks! Your spiders didn’t turn out so badly, I liked your shot. You should have seen all of my reject photos from that day. Those were bad. 🙂

      Like

Any Comments?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: